Rebecca Roy in the Press - NY Times, LA Times, Forbes Cnn...

Los Angeles Times | February 14, 2010

What makes Sammy run wild

By Rachel Abramowitz

Click here for full length article

Obsessed with success, they find themselves in frenzies when the industry's harsh reality clashes with their desires. Now, their condition has a name: Hollywood NOS.

"Heroin is a preservative," said Doug Rosen, explaining, tongue in cheek, why he looks almost exactly as he did seven years ago when he was a rising Hollywood producer with a healthy six-figure salary, a spanking new Audi A4, a $3,000-a-month, one bedroom apartment and, oh yes, an $80,000-a-year drug habit.

KTLA 5 News

Big Mistake: Man attempts male enhancement with gym weight

"It usually starts out with severe self-esteem issues...."

The player will show in this paragraph

Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2009

August angst: When therapists go on vacation

By Doree Lewak

Click here for full length article

"I usually do extensive work prior to the break around talking about their feelings and how to handle the loss of me and our relationship during that time," says Rebecca Roy, a West Hollywood therapist. "Though often painful, they are able to work through a core issue with the knowledge that it will come to an end when we reconvene."

Self Magazine | December 2008

Fishing for Friends

by Sarah Jio

Click here for full length article (pdf)

"...it's natural to be possessive of a friend, especially when you've invested time in the relationship."

KTTV Fox 11 Morning News| November 5, 2008

Tips on Dealing with Election Losses

"Well I think the first thing you need to do is let go of any anger and resentment...."

The player will show in this paragraph

Glamour.com | November 3, 2008

The Morning After: How to Avoid Post-Election Depression When Your Candidate Doesn't Win

by Sarah Jio

Click here for full length article

The post-election blues are totally normal and quite expected, says Rebecca Roy, a Southern-California-based psychotherapist. And when your guy loses, here's how to deal (without having to move to Canada)...

Hollywood Confidential with Leeza Gibbons | August 24, 2008

"Bromance" – Is your man showing affection toward one of his buddies?

Bromance is "hetero guys who have a very close, seemingly intimate relationship with another hetero guy..."

BFF Bridal | August 7, 2008

CHILL OUT

Click here for original article on BFF Bridal website: "Editorial Archive"

Rebecca Roy is a Beverly Hills shrink who's known for working with young Hollywood (www.theindustrytherapist.com). We were hoping to booze her up and get some serious dish. But that didn't happen. We did, however, get her wise insight on the unique pressures facing sophisticated city couples in planning mode.

"Upscale city dwellers look at a wedding as more of a social statement. Their guests know the difference between a Monique Lhuillier and an off-the-rack, so the pressure to keep up appearances is greater. City couples also tend to marry later in life, when both partners have already established lifestyles and careers. So it's about a lot more than a soul connection and loving a person. It's about merging two lives, really."

With that in mind, here are Roy's tips for keeping your cool in the dog days of summer.

  1. Solidify your sense of self. See a therapist, meditate, do some yoga, write in a journal — study your insides until you truly understand your own pitfalls. This will be the only way to know if you're really flipping out about the cake or if it's something deeper.
  2. Learn your partner's coping style. Understand that you're both going through a lot of stress, and both probably feeling a subtle fear of being devoured by the other person in this relationship. You'll keep arguing about the small, ridiculous stuff until you talk and understand the stresses that you're both feeling and how each of you handles that stress.
  3. Take a break. Step away from the planning chaos as often as you can. Go to the spa, read, distract yourself.
  4. Create conflicts now so you can be calm later. Be willing to face things head on. Don't try so hard to be a non-bridezilla that you end up festering over things that are really bothering you. Assert yourself in a positive way and move on.
  5. Don't be ashamed to ask for help. Recognize when you're depressed or overwhelmed and reach out to the friends you trust. That's what bridesmaids are for. Wedding planning is kind of like Christmas in that people think it's supposed to be a happy time, but it rarely is. Forget the fairy tale and remember that feeling scared, overwhelmed and off-balance is normal, not failure.

CNN.com | July 31, 2008

When 'social poachers' snatch your friends

by Sarah Jio

Click here for full length article

Beverly Hills psychotherapist Rebecca Roy-Jarboe says poachers often act without thinking.

"When we feel rejected, it's natural to feel sad and angry, but looking at the situation from another perspective helps," she says.

"Perhaps the co-worker or bridesmaid or friend is simply looking for a piece of herself in someone else, and that person is not you. It doesn't mean you aren't valuable -- just that friends are made for many reasons, change over time, and can come back together again when emotional and psychological transitions have been worked through."

Los Angeles Times | July 27, 2008

Suddenly, it's cool to be cheap — even among the wealthy.

by Monica Corcoran

Click here for full length article

"A lot of my patients are trying to keep their partners from spending wildly, and it's causing even more problems," says Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a Beverly Hills psychotherapist who counsels actors, producers and directors. (She adds that some patients have upped their $150 sessions to two or three times per week.) "But at the same time, nobody in this industry wants to be perceived as poor or old."

New York Times | July 6, 2008

How a Promotion Can Test a Friendship

by Eilene Zimmerman

Click here for full length article

Q. After the promotion, is there anything you can do to make the situation less uncomfortable for both of you?

A. Pull back a little, giving your friend time to adjust to the new role. "Don't go into their office all the time to chit-chat. You need to accept that you are the underling now and they are the boss and, at least at first, keep your relationship more businesslike," said Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a psychotherapist in Beverly Hills, Calif., who coaches executives in the entertainment industry, where, she observed, this situation often arises.

Q. If that promotion was something you wanted, will you be able to work for your friend now, despite feelings of resentment or jealousy?

A. You have to come to terms with those feelings first, Ms. Roy-Jarboe said, by talking to someone outside of work, like a spouse, a good friend or even a therapist — "anyone who can be objective and is willing to tell you the truth."

Forbes| May 14, 2008

The Star Economy: Hollywood's Next Generation

by Lauren Streib

Click here for full length article

As with any power, fame can be dangerous in young hands. The spotlight can force undue stress on kids, who have not yet developed the emotional and cognitive abilities of their parents to deal with all the attention, says Beverly Hills therapist Rebecca Roy.

Showbiz youngsters should focus on being grounded and developing their sense of self. They also require a strong support system—whether that means parents, managers or assistants—to be aware and able to recognize signs of potential psychological problems like depression and anxiety. They need "someone who grounds them and doesn't treat them like a commodity or a breadwinner," says Roy, adding, "They need people around them to realize that they're children, not mini-adults."

New York Times | February 17, 2008

Boys Will Be Boys, Girls Will Be Hounded by the Media

by Alex Williams

Click here for full length article

Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a psychotherapist in Beverly Hills, Calif., who has several clients in the entertainment industry, said that male celebrities can often wriggle out of trouble with a rakish bad-boy shrug. But, she said, the double standard can reinforce the destructive behavior of female stars, pushing them to further depths of substance abuse and erratic behavior.

Ms. Roy-Jarboe said that troubled male stars like Robert Downey Jr. are encouraged to move past problems to a second act in their careers, while the personal battles of women like Lindsay Lohan or the late Anna Nicole Smith are often played for maximum entertainment value.

"With men, there's an emphasis on, 'he had this issue, but he's getting over it,' " Ms. Roy-Jarboe said. "But with women, it's like they keep at it, keep at it. It's almost like taking the wings off of a fly."

Los Angeles Times | February 1, 2008

Bipolar Explorer

by Hilary MacGregor

Click here for full length article

"We are not talking about a town where being married and going to church every Sunday is highly valued," said Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a therapist who estimates that 75% of her clients are musicians, actors, producers and writers, and advertises her practice with the slogan "Stay Sane in an Insane Industry." "L.A. is about reaching for the heights, for whatever is possible. That is kind of a manic view: the idea that there is always a carrot on a stick in front of you and if you can just gear yourself up for it you can get it. Millions and millions of people come here for that reason."

Site Map: home | about | contact | creative blocks | relationship issues | depression | abusive work environments | anxiety | personality disorders | bipolar disorder | terms and conditions | Press

Los Angeles Times | February 14, 2010

What makes Sammy run wild

By Rachel Abramowitz

Click here for full length article

Obsessed with success, they find themselves in frenzies when the industry's harsh reality clashes with their desires. Now, their condition has a name: Hollywood NOS.

"Heroin is a preservative," said Doug Rosen, explaining, tongue in cheek, why he looks almost exactly as he did seven years ago when he was a rising Hollywood producer with a healthy six-figure salary, a spanking new Audi A4, a $3,000-a-month, one bedroom apartment and, oh yes, an $80,000-a-year drug habit.

KTLA 5 News

Big Mistake: Man attempts male enhancement with gym weight

"It usually starts out with severe self-esteem issues...."

The player will show in this paragraph

Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2009

August angst: When therapists go on vacation

By Doree Lewak

Click here for full length article

"I usually do extensive work prior to the break around talking about their feelings and how to handle the loss of me and our relationship during that time," says Rebecca Roy, a West Hollywood therapist. "Though often painful, they are able to work through a core issue with the knowledge that it will come to an end when we reconvene."

Self Magazine | December 2008

Fishing for Friends

by Sarah Jio

Click here for full length article (pdf)

"...it's natural to be possessive of a friend, especially when you've invested time in the relationship."

KTTV Fox 11 Morning News| November 5, 2008

Tips on Dealing with Election Losses

"Well I think the first thing you need to do is let go of any anger and resentment...."

The player will show in this paragraph

Glamour.com | November 3, 2008

The Morning After: How to Avoid Post-Election Depression When Your Candidate Doesn't Win

by Sarah Jio

Click here for full length article

The post-election blues are totally normal and quite expected, says Rebecca Roy, a Southern-California-based psychotherapist. And when your guy loses, here's how to deal (without having to move to Canada)...

Hollywood Confidential with Leeza Gibbons | August 24, 2008

"Bromance" – Is your man showing affection toward one of his buddies?

Bromance is "hetero guys who have a very close, seemingly intimate relationship with another hetero guy..."

BFF Bridal | August 7, 2008

CHILL OUT

Click here for original article on BFF Bridal website: "Editorial Archive"

Rebecca Roy is a Beverly Hills shrink who's known for working with young Hollywood (www.theindustrytherapist.com). We were hoping to booze her up and get some serious dish. But that didn't happen. We did, however, get her wise insight on the unique pressures facing sophisticated city couples in planning mode.

"Upscale city dwellers look at a wedding as more of a social statement. Their guests know the difference between a Monique Lhuillier and an off-the-rack, so the pressure to keep up appearances is greater. City couples also tend to marry later in life, when both partners have already established lifestyles and careers. So it's about a lot more than a soul connection and loving a person. It's about merging two lives, really."

With that in mind, here are Roy's tips for keeping your cool in the dog days of summer.

  1. Solidify your sense of self. See a therapist, meditate, do some yoga, write in a journal — study your insides until you truly understand your own pitfalls. This will be the only way to know if you're really flipping out about the cake or if it's something deeper.
  2. Learn your partner's coping style. Understand that you're both going through a lot of stress, and both probably feeling a subtle fear of being devoured by the other person in this relationship. You'll keep arguing about the small, ridiculous stuff until you talk and understand the stresses that you're both feeling and how each of you handles that stress.
  3. Take a break. Step away from the planning chaos as often as you can. Go to the spa, read, distract yourself.
  4. Create conflicts now so you can be calm later. Be willing to face things head on. Don't try so hard to be a non-bridezilla that you end up festering over things that are really bothering you. Assert yourself in a positive way and move on.
  5. Don't be ashamed to ask for help. Recognize when you're depressed or overwhelmed and reach out to the friends you trust. That's what bridesmaids are for. Wedding planning is kind of like Christmas in that people think it's supposed to be a happy time, but it rarely is. Forget the fairy tale and remember that feeling scared, overwhelmed and off-balance is normal, not failure.

CNN.com | July 31, 2008

When 'social poachers' snatch your friends

by Sarah Jio

Click here for full length article

Beverly Hills psychotherapist Rebecca Roy-Jarboe says poachers often act without thinking.

"When we feel rejected, it's natural to feel sad and angry, but looking at the situation from another perspective helps," she says.

"Perhaps the co-worker or bridesmaid or friend is simply looking for a piece of herself in someone else, and that person is not you. It doesn't mean you aren't valuable -- just that friends are made for many reasons, change over time, and can come back together again when emotional and psychological transitions have been worked through."

Los Angeles Times | July 27, 2008

Suddenly, it's cool to be cheap — even among the wealthy.

by Monica Corcoran

Click here for full length article

"A lot of my patients are trying to keep their partners from spending wildly, and it's causing even more problems," says Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a Beverly Hills psychotherapist who counsels actors, producers and directors. (She adds that some patients have upped their $150 sessions to two or three times per week.) "But at the same time, nobody in this industry wants to be perceived as poor or old."

New York Times | July 6, 2008

How a Promotion Can Test a Friendship

by Eilene Zimmerman

Click here for full length article

Q. After the promotion, is there anything you can do to make the situation less uncomfortable for both of you?

A. Pull back a little, giving your friend time to adjust to the new role. "Don't go into their office all the time to chit-chat. You need to accept that you are the underling now and they are the boss and, at least at first, keep your relationship more businesslike," said Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a psychotherapist in Beverly Hills, Calif., who coaches executives in the entertainment industry, where, she observed, this situation often arises.

Q. If that promotion was something you wanted, will you be able to work for your friend now, despite feelings of resentment or jealousy?

A. You have to come to terms with those feelings first, Ms. Roy-Jarboe said, by talking to someone outside of work, like a spouse, a good friend or even a therapist — "anyone who can be objective and is willing to tell you the truth."

Forbes| May 14, 2008

The Star Economy: Hollywood's Next Generation

by Lauren Streib

Click here for full length article

As with any power, fame can be dangerous in young hands. The spotlight can force undue stress on kids, who have not yet developed the emotional and cognitive abilities of their parents to deal with all the attention, says Beverly Hills therapist Rebecca Roy.

Showbiz youngsters should focus on being grounded and developing their sense of self. They also require a strong support system—whether that means parents, managers or assistants—to be aware and able to recognize signs of potential psychological problems like depression and anxiety. They need "someone who grounds them and doesn't treat them like a commodity or a breadwinner," says Roy, adding, "They need people around them to realize that they're children, not mini-adults."

New York Times | February 17, 2008

Boys Will Be Boys, Girls Will Be Hounded by the Media

by Alex Williams

Click here for full length article

Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a psychotherapist in Beverly Hills, Calif., who has several clients in the entertainment industry, said that male celebrities can often wriggle out of trouble with a rakish bad-boy shrug. But, she said, the double standard can reinforce the destructive behavior of female stars, pushing them to further depths of substance abuse and erratic behavior.

Ms. Roy-Jarboe said that troubled male stars like Robert Downey Jr. are encouraged to move past problems to a second act in their careers, while the personal battles of women like Lindsay Lohan or the late Anna Nicole Smith are often played for maximum entertainment value.

"With men, there's an emphasis on, 'he had this issue, but he's getting over it,' " Ms. Roy-Jarboe said. "But with women, it's like they keep at it, keep at it. It's almost like taking the wings off of a fly."

Los Angeles Times | February 1, 2008

Bipolar Explorer

by Hilary MacGregor

Click here for full length article

"We are not talking about a town where being married and going to church every Sunday is highly valued," said Rebecca Roy-Jarboe, a therapist who estimates that 75% of her clients are musicians, actors, producers and writers, and advertises her practice with the slogan "Stay Sane in an Insane Industry." "L.A. is about reaching for the heights, for whatever is possible. That is kind of a manic view: the idea that there is always a carrot on a stick in front of you and if you can just gear yourself up for it you can get it. Millions and millions of people come here for that reason."

© 2015 REBECCA ROY, Ph.D, MFT


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